A magnitude 4 earthquake that burst in the Pacific Ocean sent weak shaking into Ventura Nation and throughout the Westside, San Fernando Valley along with South Bay locations of Los Angeles County.
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A magnitude 4 earthquake that burst in the Pacific Ocean sent weak shaking into Ventura Nation and throughout the Westside, San Fernando Valley along with South Bay locations of Los Angeles County.

The earthquake struck at 2:13 a.m. Thursday about 19 miles south of Oxnard in Ventura Nation and about 15 miles southwest of Naval Base Ventura County at Point Mugu.

Malibu's Point Dume is about 25 miles northeast of the center, and Santa Monica has to do 40 miles east of the earthquake's origin. Downtown L.A. is practically 55 miles away from the epicenter.

There were no reports of damage in Oxnard, the police department said, where a dispatcher felt a bit of shaking.

The earthquake occurred in a location of a variety of mapped faults, such as the Anacapa-Dume fault, which runs beneath the Pacific Ocean parallel to the long shoreline of Malibu in order to eventually heads east into Santa Monica.

The Anacapa-Dume fault becomes part of the Transverse Varies Southern Border fault system, which goes for about 125 miles in a west-to-east direction. Other faults in the same system include Santa Monica, Hollywood, Raymond, Malibu Coast, Santa Cruz Island, and Santa Rosa Island faults, according to the Southern California Earthquake Center.

The magnitude 4 earthquake came three hours after a magnitude 3.9 earthquake burst near San Jose, sending light shaking to Morgan Hill and Gilroy, according to the USGS, as well as weak shaking around the San Francisco Bay Location, along with the Monterey, Santa Cruz, and Salinas areas.

In the past 10 days, there have actually been 3 earthquakes of magnitude 3.0, on the other hand, greater centered nearby the epicenter of Thursday early morning's earthquake off the Ventura County coast.

An average of 234 earthquakes with magnitudes between 3.0 and 4.0 take place annually in California plus Nevada, as stated by a current 3-year data sample.

The earthquake happened at a depth of 6.2 miles. Did you feel this earthquake? Think about reporting what you felt to the USGS.

Even if you didn't feel this little earthquake, you never know when the Big One is going to strike. Prepared yourself by following our five-step earthquake readiness guide and developing your own emergency situation set.

The very first version of this story was immediately produced by Quakebot, a computer system application that monitors the current earthquakes discovered by the USGS. A Times editor reviewed the post before it was published. It was subsequently updated by a Times press reporter. If you're interested in learning more about the system, visit our list of quite often asked questions.